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Conor Lastowka: My novel, Gone Whalin' is now available!

lastowka:

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One year, six months, eight days, 638 pages, 222,851 words, and 1,025,891 characters after I started writing it, my novel Gone Whalin’ is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle. If you want to go buy it now and not read the rest of this, I will understand.

It feels good to be done.

Huzzah!

Source: lastowka
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"What I had to say to you, moreover, would not take long, to wit: Practice any art, music, singing, dancing, acting, drawing, painting, sculpting, poetry, fiction, essays, reportage, no matter how well or badly, not to get money and fame, but to experience BECOMING, to find out what’s inside you, to MAKE YOUR SOUL GROW."

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Advice from 84-year-old Kurt Vonnegut's lovely letter to a high school class, a sentiment Milton Glaser recently echoed equally beautifully – a wonderful addition to history’s best meditations on the purpose of art and the notion of art as self-discovery.

Complement with Vonnegut on falling in love and his charming daily routine

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explore-blog:

Try not to smile: The late Maurice Sendak, with his beloved dog Herman (named after Herman Melville, Sendak’s great hero), photographed by Mariana Cook.
Pair with other literary pets and the authors who loved them.

explore-blog:

Try not to smile: The late Maurice Sendak, with his beloved dog Herman (named after Herman Melville, Sendak’s great hero), photographed by Mariana Cook.

Pair with other literary pets and the authors who loved them.

Source: explore-blog
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Link
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fastcompany:

We think of 3-D printers as desktop machines, stagnant workhorses used to generate piecemeal shapes for humans to relocate in the real world. But a new, stunning piece of architecture by the Mediated Matter Group at MIT Media Lab brings all of those assumptions into question.

It’s called the Silk Pavilion, and it is what researchers call a “biological swarm approach to 3-D printing.” It is a beautiful structure constructed by 6,500 live silkworms, and may be the most epicly named piece of fabrication technology since the blowtorch. 

Read more here: How MIT Is Hacking Thousands Of Worms To Print Buildings

Source: fastcompany
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wnycradiolab:

artandsciencejournal:

Adrian Göllner

The idea behind Adrian Göllner’s new ceramic works came from a theory from archeoacoustics on how sounds from previous eras could be captured in their pottery. The hypothesis was that the clay absorbed the sounds from its surroundings. As the artist describes: “This end of archeoacoustics is thought to be highly speculative and has been disproven, but the idea of clay acting as a viable recording surface has stayed with me for many years and has now resulted in a new series.” In this series, sounds are etched into the surface of the ceramics. With titles such as Vase with Sound of Man Coughing and Vase with Sound of Water Pouring, the works become—in the mind of the viewer—a space where the idea of the sound becomes transposed onto a physical object. 

Many of Göllner’s previous works have involved the recordings of sound. His series Norwegian Wood Drawings (2012) focuses on the grooves etched in old records. By transposing these etchings onto a paper surface, and away from the record player, the artist gives the recorded songs a physical form. 

Moving from paper to ceramics has involved some new techniques. To create his current series, Göllner has been working with the accomplished ceramicist Carolynne Pynn-Trudeau. As the artist describes the process, “While the leather-hard vases slowly turned on the potters wheel, the sound of live performances were scratched into the surface of the vase shapes by way of a megaphone and stylus apparatus (a process similar to Edison’s first sound-recording mechanism).” A black slip coating had been applied to the surface to excentuate the scratching while also recalling the look of ancient Greek vases. Then the final step in the process is to have the vases fired and finished. 

Göllner’s ceramic works will be exhibited with his Norwegian Wood Drawings at Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa from April 3rd to May 11th. His Norwegian Wood Drawings will also be featured in Art & Science Journal Issue 2, out this May.

- Lee Jones

Love this.  We talked about something similar in one of our podcasts.

Woa.

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Source: artandsciencejournal
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wnycradiolab:

Paper and wire sculptures by Polly Verity.

Source: wnycradiolab
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historical-nonfiction:

On Sept. 3, 1967, every car in Sweden came to a stop at 4:50 a.m., carefully switched from the left side of the road to the right, and proceeded at 5 a.m.

The whole nation switched to right-hand traffic overnight. And to the planners’ immense credit, no fatal accidents were associated with the change, and accident rates went down in the year that followed.

Source: futilitycloset.com
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"He despised phonies, his 1969 Volvo (which he also loved), know-it-all Yankees, Southerners who used the words “veranda” and “porte cochere” to put on airs, eating grape leaves, Law and Order (all franchises), cats, and Martha Stewart. In reverse order. He particularly hated Day Light Saving Time, which he referred to as The Devil’s Time. It is not lost on his family that he died the very day that he would have had to spring his clock forward. This can only be viewed as his final protest."

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Harry Stamps Obituary | Sun Herald

apsies: The obituary by which all other obituaries should be judged. Read the entire thing. It’s worth it.

You heard her.

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When I die, I hope I have an obit 10% this good.

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Oh wow, this is fantastic!

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Source: legacy.com